inFORM - Interacting With a Dynamic Shape Display

Don’t you think interactions that happen on your touch screens are a bit bland, cold, and too distant? I do. Mobile technology that bridges people in distant places should not be limited in flat displays. It should be warmer, more palpable….., and more human in order to really connect people.

Look at this tangible UI created by MIT media lab. This is how it should be.

(Source: vimeo.com)

Windows 8: The Boldest, Biggest Redesign In Microsoft’s History

I’ve been Mac user since 2008. Before that I was Windows user all the way since 1993. I wasn’t a big fan of Microsoft UIs back in the day. It was just ok design and visually not interesting at all.

Now that Microsoft made the biggest UI design on their leading OS, Windows, I have to say it’s actually quite interesting change. Yes, I know some people had a very hard time finding how to turn off the computer or other very basic functions. That was quite messed up. However, it doesn’t simply mean the design itself is bad. If you look closely, there is many interesting designs in it and you can absolutely learn from it.

It’s more educational for UX practitioners to think about WHY they designed this way and WHAT intention was behind it. I recommend to do it, It’s quite a good practice.

Related note: Look at UI and interaction design around Control Panel. It was most painful part for most of users. See how they managed this part. It is not perfect at all, but you see lots of effort. 

Usability rule #8: Do not place negative button right next to other (frequently clicked) buttons
I’m looking at you, Tumblr.

Usability rule #8: Do not place negative button right next to other (frequently clicked) buttons

I’m looking at you, Tumblr.

What the…. it’s something really new….

In fact, there are disabled people who plays piano with their own tongue, so I think it is not too crazy as it seems.

Thanks joshbyard!

Researchers Develop Interface for Paralyzed to Control Machines With Their Tongues:

A group of engineers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have created a way to control… just about anything (but most likely, things like wheelchairs) with a combination of a magnetic tongue piercing and a paired retainer.

The user would press the tongue piercing against different parts of the retainer to send signals.

…The system is called the Tongue Drive, and it relies on a waterproof retainer on the roof of the mouth containing a Li-ion battery, induction coil for charging, and and several magnetic contact points to detect the position of the tongue-mounted magnet. It’ll then beam the signal wirelessly to a mobile device—iOS devices like the iPhone and iPod Touch are mentioned—and the mobile device shoots those commands over to whichever device is meant to be controlled.

(via Steer Your Wheelchair With Your Computerized Tongue Piercing | Popular Science)

Autonomous Vehicle - From Stanford Online AI Class

It’s not the SF story, but what if all the cars in the world are completely automated? Anyway, watch this video.

Human Factors experts know that automation can help people, but too much automation can cause boredom, confusion, frustration, and ultimately accidents. However, what if your vehicle is completely automated? Well, all cars in the world are automated, the story would be much different, I guess. And fully automated car is actually in a practice phase already.

AI cars that they tested look really intelligent and stable. You will be surprised the fact that  the technology is advanced this far.

Didn’t know this :o

littlebigdetails:

Mac OS X Lion - Hold down the character key on your keyboard for a popup menu of the accented variants of said character. Use keyboard numbers for quick selection.

/via Jan van der Asdonk

This time, I present you an exquisite mobile UI examples.

Be inspired!

Thanks Mari Sheibley!

 
Why Users Fill Out Forms Faster with Unified Text Fields

Wait, really? This sounds like counter-usability principle. But if it works well, that’s actually new great method.

Why Users Fill Out Forms Faster with Unified Text Fields

Wait, really? This sounds like counter-usability principle. But if it works well, that’s actually new great method.

Project Management skill is necessary for any UX practitioners sooner or later.

At least I think this visual presentation much more comprehensive and easier than stupid MS Project interface.

thedesignerandthegrid:

Solo - project management app

via Swiss Miss

Evolution of Web by Google

This awesome visual presentation made from HTML5 explains transition of web browsers including IE, Net Scape, Opera, Safari, Firefox, and Chrome. It also contains development of markup languages. I’m sure it will be quite useful to get a grasp of web technology now and then.

Thanks Google!