Online education system: Deliberate transcript and highlighting feature
One thing I really love about Lynda.com is this feature. The user can see whole transcripts for online classes. As a video proceeds, transcript is updated real-time and a part a tutor is talking right now is highlighted.
This feature definitely make this media available to people with hearing disorder and also people who is not good at English listening. Even for native speaker, it is very useful to review what was explained and said in precise manner.
Good execution.

Online education system: Deliberate transcript and highlighting feature

One thing I really love about Lynda.com is this feature. The user can see whole transcripts for online classes. As a video proceeds, transcript is updated real-time and a part a tutor is talking right now is highlighted.

This feature definitely make this media available to people with hearing disorder and also people who is not good at English listening. Even for native speaker, it is very useful to review what was explained and said in precise manner.

Good execution.

This article showcases array of very good examples for current mobile-responsive design era. It’s deliberately explaning why it matters. A good article.

Of course, how people perceive color is highly depending on his/her cultural context. We need to learn it before deciding colors on your design. But this is still a good reference.

Because some (many) mobile website suck. This happens if mobile website does not support what the user wanted to do and the user is familiar with web interaction, user transits to full website. “32% of customers” tells that how large portion of mobile websites are doing wrong.
phcubed:

There Is No Mobile Internet!
by Marek Wolski

Because some (many) mobile website suck. This happens if mobile website does not support what the user wanted to do and the user is familiar with web interaction, user transits to full website. “32% of customers” tells that how large portion of mobile websites are doing wrong.

phcubed:

There Is No Mobile Internet!

by Marek Wolski

Having some struggle to color charts and graphs used in UI your designing? Using color palettes like Kuler is one thing, but we, UX practitioner, should be better than that. This article gives you a very quick and solid instruction based on human factors.

via PerceptualEdge

It’s recommended to read this article both beginner and expert UX practitioners. It’s always quite interesting how other professionals setup their own lab.

Yes, they are likely to be forgotten when days are busy.

betweenblog:

Not new, but good to read it again.
  1. Focus on the Primary Task
  2. Elevate the Content that People Care About
  3. Think Top Down
  4. Give People a Logical Path to Follow
  5. Make Usage Easy and Obvious
  6. Use User-Centric Terminology
  7. Minimize the Effort Required for User Input
  8. Downplay File-Handling…
Usability rule #8: Do not place negative button right next to other (frequently clicked) buttons
I’m looking at you, Tumblr.

Usability rule #8: Do not place negative button right next to other (frequently clicked) buttons

I’m looking at you, Tumblr.

That applies ANY project. Great tip!

Don’t spend too much time for planning your study!
Sometimes do first improve next works much better. 

pmtips:

Your plan will never be perfect - it just needs to be good enough to point you in the right direction and should continually evolve.

Hey hey, this Human Centered Design toolkit looks really slick and useful.I think I should try it.
You can download this toolkit from here. http://www.ideo.com/work/human-centered-design-toolkit
Additional note: Yes, this is MUST read for those who do ethnographic/anthropological qualitative research.
Thanks, IDEO and utilitarianthings!

“For years, businesses have used human-centered design to develop innovative solutions. Why not apply the same approach to overcome challenges in the nonprofit world?
The HCD Toolkit was designed specifically for NGOs and social enterprises that work with impoverished communities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The free kit, available for download here, walks users through the human-centered design process and supports them in activities such as building listening skills, running workshops, and implementing ideas. The process has led to innovations such as the HeartStart defibrillator, CleanWell natural antibacterial products, and the Blood Donor System for the Red Cross—all of which have enhanced the lives of millions of people.”
Hey hey, this Human Centered Design toolkit looks really slick and useful.I think I should try it.
You can download this toolkit from here. http://www.ideo.com/work/human-centered-design-toolkit
Additional note: Yes, this is MUST read for those who do ethnographic/anthropological qualitative research.
Thanks, IDEO and utilitarianthings!

“For years, businesses have used human-centered design to develop innovative solutions. Why not apply the same approach to overcome challenges in the nonprofit world?
The HCD Toolkit was designed specifically for NGOs and social enterprises that work with impoverished communities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The free kit, available for download here, walks users through the human-centered design process and supports them in activities such as building listening skills, running workshops, and implementing ideas. The process has led to innovations such as the HeartStart defibrillator, CleanWell natural antibacterial products, and the Blood Donor System for the Red Cross—all of which have enhanced the lives of millions of people.”
Hey hey, this Human Centered Design toolkit looks really slick and useful.I think I should try it.
You can download this toolkit from here. http://www.ideo.com/work/human-centered-design-toolkit
Additional note: Yes, this is MUST read for those who do ethnographic/anthropological qualitative research.
Thanks, IDEO and utilitarianthings!

“For years, businesses have used human-centered design to develop innovative solutions. Why not apply the same approach to overcome challenges in the nonprofit world?
The HCD Toolkit was designed specifically for NGOs and social enterprises that work with impoverished communities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The free kit, available for download here, walks users through the human-centered design process and supports them in activities such as building listening skills, running workshops, and implementing ideas. The process has led to innovations such as the HeartStart defibrillator, CleanWell natural antibacterial products, and the Blood Donor System for the Red Cross—all of which have enhanced the lives of millions of people.”
Hey hey, this Human Centered Design toolkit looks really slick and useful.I think I should try it.
You can download this toolkit from here. http://www.ideo.com/work/human-centered-design-toolkit
Additional note: Yes, this is MUST read for those who do ethnographic/anthropological qualitative research.
Thanks, IDEO and utilitarianthings!

“For years, businesses have used human-centered design to develop innovative solutions. Why not apply the same approach to overcome challenges in the nonprofit world?
The HCD Toolkit was designed specifically for NGOs and social enterprises that work with impoverished communities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The free kit, available for download here, walks users through the human-centered design process and supports them in activities such as building listening skills, running workshops, and implementing ideas. The process has led to innovations such as the HeartStart defibrillator, CleanWell natural antibacterial products, and the Blood Donor System for the Red Cross—all of which have enhanced the lives of millions of people.”

Hey hey, this Human Centered Design toolkit looks really slick and useful.
I think I should try it.

You can download this toolkit from here. 
http://www.ideo.com/work/human-centered-design-toolkit

Additional note: Yes, this is MUST read for those who do ethnographic/anthropological qualitative research.

Thanks, IDEO and utilitarianthings!

“For years, businesses have used human-centered design to develop innovative solutions. Why not apply the same approach to overcome challenges in the nonprofit world?

The HCD Toolkit was designed specifically for NGOs and social enterprises that work with impoverished communities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The free kit, available for download here, walks users through the human-centered design process and supports them in activities such as building listening skills, running workshops, and implementing ideas. The process has led to innovations such as the HeartStart defibrillator, CleanWell natural antibacterial products, and the Blood Donor System for the Red Cross—all of which have enhanced the lives of millions of people.”