Although the economy is getting better than it was in 2008, the job market is still buyer’s market: which means the job market is still very competitive and hard to find your ideal job.  Especially if you are battling your way in UX related field, there are many things to consider before talking with hiring manager at companies you are interested in.

I would like to share a few things for hunting jobs as UX designer or researcher that I have learned during my job hunting. Here is the first thing…

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It’s a very good summary for you to remember what basic things user experience designer should do. The good thing about this article is it’s really focusing on EXPERIENCE design rather than UI or interaction design alone.

A good memory refresh.

UX: Direct interaction between company product and users

CX: All connection points between company and customers including ads, social media, discussion board, etc.

This makes CX a large part of branding strategy.

From UXmas

UX

I’ve met so many people who only talk about UI and interaction designs when it comes to discuss UX. Sometimes I feel like these people use the word “UX design” as a fancier way to say “UI and Interaction design”. Terrible misunderstanding. I would like to address what UX design is from my perspective once and for all.

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Usability rule #8: Do not place negative button right next to other (frequently clicked) buttons
I’m looking at you, Tumblr.

Usability rule #8: Do not place negative button right next to other (frequently clicked) buttons

I’m looking at you, Tumblr.

Hey hey, this Human Centered Design toolkit looks really slick and useful.I think I should try it.
You can download this toolkit from here. http://www.ideo.com/work/human-centered-design-toolkit
Additional note: Yes, this is MUST read for those who do ethnographic/anthropological qualitative research.
Thanks, IDEO and utilitarianthings!

“For years, businesses have used human-centered design to develop innovative solutions. Why not apply the same approach to overcome challenges in the nonprofit world?
The HCD Toolkit was designed specifically for NGOs and social enterprises that work with impoverished communities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The free kit, available for download here, walks users through the human-centered design process and supports them in activities such as building listening skills, running workshops, and implementing ideas. The process has led to innovations such as the HeartStart defibrillator, CleanWell natural antibacterial products, and the Blood Donor System for the Red Cross—all of which have enhanced the lives of millions of people.”
Hey hey, this Human Centered Design toolkit looks really slick and useful.I think I should try it.
You can download this toolkit from here. http://www.ideo.com/work/human-centered-design-toolkit
Additional note: Yes, this is MUST read for those who do ethnographic/anthropological qualitative research.
Thanks, IDEO and utilitarianthings!

“For years, businesses have used human-centered design to develop innovative solutions. Why not apply the same approach to overcome challenges in the nonprofit world?
The HCD Toolkit was designed specifically for NGOs and social enterprises that work with impoverished communities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The free kit, available for download here, walks users through the human-centered design process and supports them in activities such as building listening skills, running workshops, and implementing ideas. The process has led to innovations such as the HeartStart defibrillator, CleanWell natural antibacterial products, and the Blood Donor System for the Red Cross—all of which have enhanced the lives of millions of people.”
Hey hey, this Human Centered Design toolkit looks really slick and useful.I think I should try it.
You can download this toolkit from here. http://www.ideo.com/work/human-centered-design-toolkit
Additional note: Yes, this is MUST read for those who do ethnographic/anthropological qualitative research.
Thanks, IDEO and utilitarianthings!

“For years, businesses have used human-centered design to develop innovative solutions. Why not apply the same approach to overcome challenges in the nonprofit world?
The HCD Toolkit was designed specifically for NGOs and social enterprises that work with impoverished communities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The free kit, available for download here, walks users through the human-centered design process and supports them in activities such as building listening skills, running workshops, and implementing ideas. The process has led to innovations such as the HeartStart defibrillator, CleanWell natural antibacterial products, and the Blood Donor System for the Red Cross—all of which have enhanced the lives of millions of people.”
Hey hey, this Human Centered Design toolkit looks really slick and useful.I think I should try it.
You can download this toolkit from here. http://www.ideo.com/work/human-centered-design-toolkit
Additional note: Yes, this is MUST read for those who do ethnographic/anthropological qualitative research.
Thanks, IDEO and utilitarianthings!

“For years, businesses have used human-centered design to develop innovative solutions. Why not apply the same approach to overcome challenges in the nonprofit world?
The HCD Toolkit was designed specifically for NGOs and social enterprises that work with impoverished communities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The free kit, available for download here, walks users through the human-centered design process and supports them in activities such as building listening skills, running workshops, and implementing ideas. The process has led to innovations such as the HeartStart defibrillator, CleanWell natural antibacterial products, and the Blood Donor System for the Red Cross—all of which have enhanced the lives of millions of people.”

Hey hey, this Human Centered Design toolkit looks really slick and useful.
I think I should try it.

You can download this toolkit from here. 
http://www.ideo.com/work/human-centered-design-toolkit

Additional note: Yes, this is MUST read for those who do ethnographic/anthropological qualitative research.

Thanks, IDEO and utilitarianthings!

“For years, businesses have used human-centered design to develop innovative solutions. Why not apply the same approach to overcome challenges in the nonprofit world?

The HCD Toolkit was designed specifically for NGOs and social enterprises that work with impoverished communities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The free kit, available for download here, walks users through the human-centered design process and supports them in activities such as building listening skills, running workshops, and implementing ideas. The process has led to innovations such as the HeartStart defibrillator, CleanWell natural antibacterial products, and the Blood Donor System for the Red Cross—all of which have enhanced the lives of millions of people.”

Touch gestures on WIndows 8 and its usability issues

Here is one very good article about new Windows 8 UI, metro, from Windows developer group themselves. You can see neat breakdown of touch gestures in Windows 8 and potential issues.

Must read if you are interaction designer that involves touch gesture stuff.

Via: MSDN Blogs

One major aspect of usability study is to take out unnecessaries and well present essentials. In that perspective, minimalism is one significant design approach to get things right. This article will help you to think about “what is a proper way of minimalism” with out messing up.

pixelsign:

Minimalism, interestingly enough, is usually born out of excess. In all arts, in all ways of life, we start out by taking and adding whatever we can.

When we start to realize that more is not necessarily better, and that we can get by with less stuff, we try to simplify by removing unnecessary elements so we can focus on what’s truly important.

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Herman Miller Sayl Chair by Yves Bahr
I’m moving out to the new residence. Therefore, I need a new desk chair and desk.
After all intense researches both offline and online, I reached the conclusion that this Sayl Chair might be the best ergonomics chair offered under $500. Since I’m always sitting on my chair when I’m in my house a desk chair is the most important furniture for computer person like me.
 This vid pretty much describes what’s special about this chair:

As all ergonomist know, the most important factor for this kind of chair is lumber support. Their lumber support mechanism looks very reasonable to me: The back support shape is respectively help L5/S1 section of the lumber, and flexible material guarantees degree of freedom on my lumber movement. Arm rest height adjustment, chair height adjustment, and lumber support angle adjustment are also quite nicely implemented (Well, but if you add all adjustment options, it will cost you like $900, though). The cushion is somewhat questionable since it is very thin and I’m not sure if my butt can get hurt or not.
The chair will arrive in January. Let’s see how good this chair is then.

Herman Miller Sayl Chair by Yves Bahr

I’m moving out to the new residence. Therefore, I need a new desk chair and desk.

After all intense researches both offline and online, I reached the conclusion that this Sayl Chair might be the best ergonomics chair offered under $500. Since I’m always sitting on my chair when I’m in my house a desk chair is the most important furniture for computer person like me.

 This vid pretty much describes what’s special about this chair:

As all ergonomist know, the most important factor for this kind of chair is lumber support. Their lumber support mechanism looks very reasonable to me: The back support shape is respectively help L5/S1 section of the lumber, and flexible material guarantees degree of freedom on my lumber movement. Arm rest height adjustment, chair height adjustment, and lumber support angle adjustment are also quite nicely implemented (Well, but if you add all adjustment options, it will cost you like $900, though). The cushion is somewhat questionable since it is very thin and I’m not sure if my butt can get hurt or not.

The chair will arrive in January. Let’s see how good this chair is then.

There is still the fat-finger problem, which the users’ finger occlude a target they are about to touch and it causes inaccuracy/error, exists on Kindle Fire. In addition to this article, I would like to say that touchable area mappings on Kindle Fire and iPhones/iPads are slightly different: actually iPhone’s touch area mapped almost 5-6 mm lower than a graphical object, while Amazon Kindle mapped a bit more above than that. (See Holtz and Baudisch, 2009 to understand the reason behind this offset)

Since iPhone/iPad/iPod touch interaction is de-facto standard in mobile touch device world, such a deviation could cause user confusion and unnatural feelings.

Amazon Kindle Fire came to multi-touch device market much later than Apple. Amazon could have taken advantage of newcomer’s flexibility by putting much ambitious design in their design, but what they brought is quite conservative design, which, in fact, is much less cooler than their competitor’s device in my perspective.

Source: Jacob Nielsen’s Alert Box